RESOURCES

Khalil Gibran Muhammad speaking at a student lunch
Khalil Gibran Muhammad at a student lunch hosted by Radcliffe prior to his lecture “How Numbers Lie: Intersectional Violence and the Quantification of Race.” Muhammad is the Ford Foundation Professor of History, Race and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and he directs the Institutional Antiracism and Accountability Project. He is a former Suzanne Young Murray Professor at Harvard Radcliffe Institute and was a 2019–2020 Radcliffe fellow. Photo by Tony Rinaldo

Part of the work of the Initiative on Harvard & the Legacy of Slavery is to develop resources to help all members of our community learn about this history and engage with the important work that lies ahead.

The initiative’s first phase, which began in December 2019 and concluded in April 2022 with the release of the Report of the Presidential Committee on Harvard & the Legacy of Slavery, was an effort to uncover Harvard's past—the University’s links to slavery. With the report's release, we turn our focus to the critical work of remedy, and we invite all members of our community to engage.

A faciltiation guide accompanies the initiative's film introducing the report's historical findings, and a case study by Orelia Jonathan, Caroline Tucker, and Meira Levinson, is offered as a tool for faculty, staff, students, alumni, and others interested in considering the process of reckoning and repair. More will come in the weeks ahead.

For members of our community seeking support for mental, spiritual, and emotional well-being, we offer a link to Community Care Resources.

The Harvard shield, featuring the word Veritas, on an ornate iron gate.

Normative Case Study: A Forced Reckoning

A Forced Reckoning, by Orelia Jonathan, Caroline Tucker, and Meira Levinson, explores the challenges of engaging students in learning about Harvard’s ties to the institution of slavery. It is a tool for faculty, staff, students, alumni, and others interested in considering the questions: What responsibility does the University have to teach this history, and what are our personal responsibilities to learn? How might different approaches to teaching this history promote versus impeding equity, diversity, inclusion, and belonging on campus?

The authors also co-taught a Spring 2022 course that supported Harvard students in researching and writing additional narrative case studies. These materials will be made available on this site as they are finalized in Summer and Fall 2022.

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